Top 5: DIY Bonefishing Lodges in the Bahamas

October 23rd, 2013| No Comments

The best options for budget-conscious bonefishermen travelling to the Bahamas…

Destination: Mount Pleasant Lodge, Andros Island

DIY bonefishing at Mount Pleasant Lodge, Andros Island, Bahamas

Perfect for… wading right out of the front door. On a good day, you can see bonefish tailing on the flats while you sit outside your cottage. Also, just a 20-minute wade south is the White Bight, a pristine pancake flat straight out of the average bonefisherman’s dream. This being Andros, there’s always the chance of running into a very big fish. And if you tire of the DIY stuff, the lodge can hook you up with a guide – some of the world’s best work in the area.

DIY bonefishing: Mount Pleasant Lodge, AndrosFishipedia’s top tip: Hit the White Bight on a falling tide. As the tide rises, the bones disappear into the mangroves that line the flat, but as it falls, they start emerging in big schools.

How much does it cost?
From $210 per person, per night (double occupancy)
From $235 per person, per night (single occupancy)
Wade guides from $225 per day; boat guides from $475 

>>Find out more about Mount Pleasant Fishing Lodge

 

Destination: Long Island Bonefishing Lodge

DIY bonefishing at Long Island Bonefishing Lodge, BahamasPerfect for… moderately experienced bonefishermen. “Assisted” DIY bonefishing is the name of the game at Long Island Bonefishing Lodge – this means a guide transports you to the flats, gives you a few tips on how to fish it, but then leave you alone to get on with fishing. It’s a great concept – particularly if you’re the type who doesn’t need or want instruction on casting, fly selection and the like, but could do with a helping hand getting to the right spot.

Long Island Bonefishing LodgeFishipedia’s top tip: Consider budgeting for at least one fully guided day – the bigger fish round here tend to frequent the oceanside flats, most of which are only really accessible by skiff.

How much does it cost?
From $1,600 per person, per week, based on double occupancy

>>Find out more about Long Island Bonefishing Lodge

 

Destination: Salina Point Bonefish Lodge, Acklins Island

DIY Bonefishing at Salina Point, Acklins Island, BahamasPerfect for… those in search of a secluded fishery. Secreted away on sparsely populated AcklinsIsland, Salina Point has carved itself a niche as a great option for budget-conscious, adventurous anglers in search of reliable and remote DIY bonefishing. There’s a shuttle service to nearby flats (or you can just walk to the one right outside the lodge) and guides are available on request. If you like wading for bonefish, this place is hard to top. This video of DIY bonefishing at Salina Point provides a good taster.

DIY bonefishing at Salina PointFishipedia’s top tip: Pack a couple of permit flies – you won’t come across too many, but they’re known to make the occasional appearance. And as you can see, the cudas get pretty big round here too…

How much does it cost? From $1,378 per person, per week, double occupancy

>>Find out more about Salina Point Bonefishing Lodge

 

Destination: Two Boys Inn, Andros Island

DIY bonefishing in the Bahamas: Two Boys Inn LodgePerfect for… mixing guided days with DIY. This lodge, owned by esteemed guide Frankie Neymour and his wife Melinda, is at the mouth of Cargill Creek, the epicentre of bonefishing’s hallowed ground. Truth be told, you’d be a fool to stay here and consider fishing exclusively DIY. That would mean passing up the opportunity to spend time on the water with Frankie – these waters are renowned for their big bonefish and Frankie’s a master at finding them. Unguided days can be spent exploring the vast oceanside flats north of Cargill Creek.

Frankie NeymourFishipedia’s top tip: Be prepared to run into some very large fish. Lots of places boast about how many double-digit bones they have, only a few of them are the real deal. This falls into the latter category. So, tackle up accordingly – if you spend a few days here, you’ll run into a bruiser at some point.

How much does it cost?
$125 per person, per night ($315 including fishing). Single occupancy is $175 per person ($380 including fishing)

>>Find out more about Two Boys Inn, Andros 

Destination: Seascape Inn, Andros Island

DIY bonefishing at the Seascape Inn, Andros Island

Perfect for… taking your non-fishing partner. It’s a delicate balance and it’s hard to get it right – holidaying with someone who doesn’t fish means choosing your destination wisely. There should be enough for them to do while you’re fishing, but similarly, you want to be able to access the flats quickly and easily. The Seascape Inn ticks the relevant boxes – there’s a flat right out the front, meaning you could be out looking for tailing fish at sunrise and back in your cottage before it’s time for breakfast. And if you want to explore further afield, there are easily accessible flats all along this stretch of coast and some top-notch guides available if your budget allows.

DIY bonefishing at the Seascape Inn, Andros IslandFishipedia’s top tip: Grab one of the bikes (free to use for all guests) and cycle down to Lisbon Creek. This is a huge flat and a regular hunting ground for big schools of bonefish.

How much does it cost? From $159 per night for a beachfront cabana (including use of bikes and kayaks, use of beach towels, water floats, wireless internet and daily maid service).

>> Find out more about the Seascape Inn, Andros

 

And a few others to consider:

Halvorson House, Cat Island — particularly well suited to those with young kids (check out Louis Cahill’s report on DIY Bonefishing in Cat Island for more info)

Chez Pierre, Long Island, Bahamas — a selection of modestly priced waterfront cottages, with plenty of scope for DIY action, and local guides available from $300

Rainbow Inn, Eleuthera — family-run operation near Governor’s Harbour. Hire a car, hit the road and you’ll find one flat after another. The fishing’s not always easy, but the options are plentiful and the Rainbow Inn is a great base. Recommended for anyone travelling with a non-fishing partner

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